8123s

steambot-timelord:

ashkenazi-autie:

eileenthequeen:

eileenthequeen:

So apparently in my sister’s class, there was a trans girl that had been on the cheerleading squad for a while. When she came out, the other girls on the squad made the agreement that whatever boy made fun of her would never get a date. And if you think that’s not the most metal girl alliance ever, you can sit down.

Wow, 500 notes

Girls protecting girls.

GIRLS PROTECTING GIRLS

rhubabe
hate:

typical:

parliamentarians:

Racism and ignorance clearly evident in our society, as experienced by my friend’s sister. This is what her potential dorm roommate, whom she had never met or talked to before, tweeted about her.
"Today I googled my last name and found this as one of the search results. Apparently, just by looking at my profile picture, I am Indian and I can barely speak english. This, my friends, is a prime example of racial profiling. I am an American citizen. I was born in Houston, Texas. My roots are not from India but from Africa. My parents are Algerian. I am Algerian American. English is my primary language and it is a struggle for me to speak my parent’s native tongue. My name is pronounced exactly as it is spelled. I wear a hijab (a head covering), and not a niqab ( a facial covering that excludes the eyes) though I do admire, respect, and find the beauty in all those who do choose to wear the niqab. But this girl is right, I probably would have had a heart attack living with a person who could not, and refused to, respect me and my beliefs. I can only thank God for an opening of a single room shortly after they assigned this roommate, way before I knew she had posted any of this. Alhamdullilah. I also thank God for being born in Houston, one of the most multicultural cities in the United States, and not experiencing racism like this everyday of my life. Sunday is my move in day and the start of my college career. This can be nothing but a good sign for the years to come, inshaAllah.  In conclusion, I urge everyone, please, don’t judge a person by their appearances. Racism exists in this nation because we continue to do so. We have to look beyond the covers of appearances and read the texts of their characters. Stand with me and ‪#‎stopracism‬.” -Roukaya Mabizari

She should be banned from life

this is so fucked up

hate:

typical:

parliamentarians:

Racism and ignorance clearly evident in our society, as experienced by my friend’s sister. This is what her potential dorm roommate, whom she had never met or talked to before, tweeted about her.

"Today I googled my last name and found this as one of the search results. Apparently, just by looking at my profile picture, I am Indian and I can barely speak english. This, my friends, is a prime example of racial profiling. I am an American citizen. I was born in Houston, Texas. My roots are not from India but from Africa. My parents are Algerian. I am Algerian American. English is my primary language and it is a struggle for me to speak my parent’s native tongue. My name is pronounced exactly as it is spelled. I wear a hijab (a head covering), and not a niqab ( a facial covering that excludes the eyes) though I do admire, respect, and find the beauty in all those who do choose to wear the niqab. But this girl is right, I probably would have had a heart attack living with a person who could not, and refused to, respect me and my beliefs. I can only thank God for an opening of a single room shortly after they assigned this roommate, way before I knew she had posted any of this. Alhamdullilah. I also thank God for being born in Houston, one of the most multicultural cities in the United States, and not experiencing racism like this everyday of my life.
Sunday is my move in day and the start of my college career. This can be nothing but a good sign for the years to come, inshaAllah.
In conclusion, I urge everyone, please, don’t judge a person by their appearances. Racism exists in this nation because we continue to do so. We have to look beyond the covers of appearances and read the texts of their characters. Stand with me and ‪#‎stopracism‬.”
-Roukaya Mabizari

She should be banned from life

this is so fucked up

rhubabe

A thought experiment: Imagine how people might react if Taylor Swift released an album made up entirely of songs about wishing she could get back together with one of her exes.

We’d hear things like: “She can’t let go. She’s clingy. She’s irrational. She’s crazy.” Men would have a field day comparing her to their own “crazy” exes.

Yet when Robin Thicke released “Paula” – a plea for reconciliation with his ex-wife Paula Patton disguised as an LP — he was called incoherent, obsessed, heartfelt and, in particular, creepy.

But you didn’t hear men calling him “crazy” — even though he used it as the title of one of tracks.

No, “crazy” is typically held in reserve for women’s behavior. Men might be obsessed, driven, confused or upset. But we don’t get called “crazy” — at least not the way men reflexively label women as such.

“Crazy” is one of the five deadly words guys use to shame women into compliance. The others: Fat. Ugly. Slutty. Bitchy. They sum up the supposedly worst things a woman can be.

WHAT WE REALLY MEAN BY “CRAZY” IS: “SHE WAS UPSET, AND I DIDN’T WANT HER TO BE.”

“Crazy” is such a convenient word for men, perpetuating our sense of superiority. Men are logical; women are emotional. Emotion is the antithesis of logic. When women are too emotional, we say they are being irrational. Crazy. Wrong.

Women hear it all the time from men. “You’re overreacting,” we tell them. “Don’t worry about it so much, you’re over-thinking it.” “Don’t be so sensitive.” “Don’t be crazy.” It’s a form of gaslighting — telling women that their feelings are just wrong, that they don’t have the right to feel the way that they do. Minimizing somebody else’s feelings is a way of controlling them. If they no longer trust their own feelings and instincts, they come to rely on someone else to tell them how they’re supposed to feel.

Small wonder that abusers love to use this c-word. It’s a way of delegitimizing a woman’s authority over her own life.

Most men (#notallmen, #irony) aren’t abusers, but far too many of us reflexively call women crazy without thinking about it. We talk about how “crazy girl sex” is the best sex while we also warn men “don’t stick it in the crazy.” How I Met Your Mother warned us to watch out for “the crazy eyes” and how to process women on the “Crazy/Hot” scale. When we talk about why we broke up with our exes, we say, “She got crazy,” and our guy friends nod sagely, as if that explains everything.

Except what we’re really saying is: “She was upset, and I didn’t want her to be.”

Many men are socialized to be disconnected from our emotions — the only manly feelings we’re supposed to show are stoic silence or anger. We’re taught that to be emotional is to be feminine. As a result, we barely have a handle on our own emotions — meaning that we’re especially ill-equipped at dealing with someone else’s.

That’s where “crazy” comes in. It’s the all-purpose argument ender. Your girlfriend is upset that you didn’t call when you were going to be late? She’s being irrational. She wants you to spend time with her instead of out with the guys again? She’s being clingy. Your wife doesn’t like the long hours you’re spending with your attractive co-worker? She’s being oversensitive.

As soon as the “crazy” card is in play, women are put on the defensive. It derails the discussion from what she’s saying to how she’s saying it. We insist that someone can’t be emotional and rational at the same time, so she has to prove that she’s not being irrational. Anything she says to the contrary can just be used as evidence against her.

More often than not, I suspect, most men don’t realize what we’re saying when we call a woman crazy. Not only does it stigmatize people who have legitimate mental health issues, but it tells women that they don’t understand their own emotions, that their very real concerns and issues are secondary to men’s comfort. And it absolves men from having to take responsibility for how we make others feel.

In the professional world, we’ve had debates over labels like “bossy” and “brusque,” so often used to describe women, not men. In our interpersonal relationships and conversations, “crazy” is the adjective that needs to go.